ugg boots zebra print

ugg boots zebra print

2016-05-24 08:56:37



adidas yeezy boost 750 ebayquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopin,yeezy 350 moonrock bottomquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinadidas yeezy 350 boost release date

adidas yeezy boost 350 oxford tan foot lockerquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopin,adidas yeezy lowquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinyeezy boost history

adidas yeezy historyquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopin,yeezy boost x ovoquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinquo;They would object very strongly to the NSA’s doing that,” he said.The streets of Ferguson, Mo. erupted in protest this weekend following the fatal police shooting of unarmed, black teenager Michael Brown on Saturday. But an organized form of protest quickly emerged on social media as well, aiming to address a rhetorical question that resonates among some in the African American community: “If they gunned me down,” what picture would the media use to represent me?The viral #IfTheyGunnedMeDown hashtag was a response to how Brown was initially portrayed in the media. Rather than using photographs of the 18-year-old, reportedly known to his friends as a “gentle giant”, in a graduation picture or in a sports team, many outlets used the following visual:Corrected Link: Unarmed Missouri teen killed by officer after 'physical confrontation' http://t.co/JITP7e9iJa pic.twitter.com/t4CNLdq6C4— NBC News (@NBCNews) August 10, 2014The photo led to unsubstantiated tweets calling Brown a “thug” who was flashing “gang signs” — with many noting that similar images of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen shot by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Feb. 2012, elicited a similar response after they were used by the media.In frustration at what they see as media reliance on menacing stereotypes, Twitter users have been posting contrasting images of themselves on social media, tagged with #IfTheyGunnedMeDown. So a photo of a minority male reading to children in army fatigues, for example, might be juxtaposed with that same man in a chain necklace mugging for the camera. Men and women of color have been posting images, but the message is being spread by concerned people regardless of race.Here’s a collection of some of the trending tweets:#IfTheyGunnedMeDown they'd say i was a thug pic.twitter.com/JsLxga0uwv— Devin Griffin (@HAMAthletic) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown what picture would they use pic.twitter.com/lJ3k3tT63n— Kevin Gates's Nephew (@LandLordBrasi) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown What Picture You Think The Media Will Use ? #RestInPeaceMikeBrown 🙌🙏💯 pic.twitter.com/qrDtu9hMyn— IG: Yrn_Prince ✨✨ (@IAm_TravisPortA) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown I wonder which way we'd be portrayed… @Stoop_Kid24 pic.twitter.com/h1rndSHXGk— Slimi Thindrix (@EmmarrButler) August 11, 2014#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Which Pic Would The News Use? pic.twitter.com/fDdfJj2bjo— Macks (@LiibanMakail) August 11, 2014"@KingMira_: Loving this hashtag.. #IfTheyGunnedMeDown it's really eye opening 😳 pic.twitter.com/jstqGbtd1S"— Alexandra (@Dra_DGAF) August 11, 2014The accuracy behind these pictures #IfTheyGunnedMeDown pic.twitter.com/QyCwJY6iMz— 无情 (@SociaIizing) August 11, 2014President Obama was eager to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq, is eager to pull them out of Afghanistan, and refused to put them into Libya and Syria. His reticence is justifiably rooted in opposition at home to any more ground combat following more than a decade of war after 9/11.But over the weekend, he warned that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s threat to Kurdish city of Erbil in northern Iraq warranted U.S. military airstrikes, and that they could continue over a sustained period of time. “I don’t think we’re going to solve this problem in weeks,” he said Saturday. “This is going to take some time.” On Sunday, Kurdish forces reportedly ousted ISIS fighters from a pair of border towns 20 miles from Erbil as U.S. warplanes conducted a third consecutive day of attacks on ISIS forces.Changes in waging war have proliferated since the so-called non-state actors known as al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center towers, attacked the Pentagon and sent United Flight 93 diving into a Pennsylvania field. The foe is elusive, metamorphosing from al-Qaeda in Iraq to ISIS, as the jihadist leaders wage battle among themselves for supremacy.Any conflict that begins, as the latest Iraq venture did, with humanitarian airdrops to thousands of dehydrated and hungry Yazidis in and around Mount Sinjar makes for a different kind of war.Obama said he acted because of concerns for the safety of U.S. military advisers and consular officials in Erbil, threatened by an ISIS advances over the past week. The advisers are there, and in Baghdad, to plot how the U.S. can aid the Iraqi government of Nouri al-Maliki in its battle against ISIS. Without such a U.S. stake in Libya or Syria, he has felt no need to take military action there.But the flames now burning around the Middle East are part of a larger conflagration, fueled by crumbling autocracies and religious zealots, who are recruiting unemployed young men eager to belong to something bigger than themselves.The U.S. and other Western nations essentially are biding their time, hopinadidas yeezy boost 350 oxford tan



  • yeezy 350 boost history
  • adidas yeezy collection
  • yeezy 350 restock online release
  • adidas yeezy vip
  • yeezy 350 boost size 5
  • adidas yeezy 2016 price
  • yeezy 350 turtle dove back
  • yeezy boost niketalk
  • yeezy 350 moonrock legit check
  • yeezy 350 pirate black authentic
  • yeezy 350 boost kanye
  • yeezy 350 restock store list
  • yeezy 350 boost iphone wallpaper
  • yeezy 350 adidas originals
  • adidas yeezy boost vs nike roshe
  • yeezy boost fake
  • yeezy 350 true to size
  • adidas yeezy 950 replica
  • yeezy boost insole
  • adidas yeezy authentic
  • adidas yeezy boost weight
  • yeezy 350 moonrock adidas confirmed
  • yeezy 350 pirate black comparison
  • adidas yeezy 3 boost price
  • yeezy 350 pirate black vs turtle dove
  • adidas yeezy net worth
  • adidas yeezy black colorway
  • yeezy boost price 350
  • yeezy 350 boost size 5
  • yeezy 350 pirate black finish line
  • adidas yeezy boost pirate black in store raffle
  • yeezy 350 turtle dove fake
  • yeezy 350 colorways list

  •  

    ugg boots zebra print